updated sacy – now with external tools

I’ve just updated the sacy repository again and tagged a v0.3-beta1 release.

The main feature since yesterday is support for the official compilers and
tools if you can provide them on the target machine.

The drawback is that these things come with hefty dependencies at times (I
don’t think you’d find a shared hoster willing to install node.js or Ruby for
you), but if you can provide the tools, you can get some really nice
advantages over the PHP ports of the various compilers:

  • the PHP port of sass has an issue that prevents
    @import from working. sacy’s build script does patch that, but the way they
    were parsing the file names doesn’t inspire confidence in the library. You
    might get a more robust solution by using the official tool.

  • uglifier-js is a bit faster than JSMin, produces significantly smaller
    output and comes with a better license (JSMin isn’t strictly free software
    as it has this “do no evil” clause)

  • coffee script is under very heavy development, so I’d much rather use the
    upstream source than some experimental fun project. So far I haven’t seen
    issues with coffeescript-php, but then I haven’t been using it much yet.

Absent from the list you’ll find less and css minification:

  • the PHP native CSSMin is really good and
    there’s no single official external tool out that demonstrably better (maybe
    the YUI compressor, but I’m not going to support something that requires me
    to deal with Java)

  • lessphp is very lightweight and yet very full
    featured and very actively developed. It also has a nice advantage over the
    native solution in that the currently released native compiler does not
    support reading its input from STDIN, so if you want to use the official
    less, you have to go with the git HEAD.

Feel free to try this out (and/or send me a patch)!

Oh and by the way: If you want to use uglifier or the original coffee script
and you need node but can’t install it, have a look at the
static binary I created

updated sacy – now with more coffee

I’ve just updated the sacy repository
to now also provide support for compiling Coffee Script.

 type="text/coffeescript" src="/file1.coffee">
 type="text/javascript" src="/file2.js">

will now not compile file1.coffee into JS before creating and linking one big chunk of minified JavaScript.

 type="text/javascript" src="/assetcache/file2-deadbeef1234.js">

As always, the support is seamless – this is all you have to do.

Again, in order to keep deployment simple, I decided to go with a pure PHP solution (coffeescript-php).

I do see some advantages in the native solutions though (performance, better output), so I’m actively looking into a solution to detect the availability of native converters that I could shell out to without having to hit the file system on every request.

Also, when adding the coffee support, I noticed that the architecture of sacy isn’t perfect for doing this transformation stuff. Too much code had to be duplicated between CSS and JavaScript, so I will do a bit of refactoring there.

Once both the support for external tools and the refactoring of the transformation is completed, I’m going to release v0.3, but if you want/need coffee support right now, go ahead and clone
the repository.

node to go

Having node.js around on your machine can be very useful – not just if you are
building your new fun project, but also for
quite real world applications.

For me it was coffee script.

After reading some incredibly beautiful coffee code by @brainlock
(work related, so I can’t link the code), I decided that I wanted to use
coffee in PopScan and as such I need coffee support in sacy which handles
asset compilation for us.

This means that I need node.js on the server (sacy is allowing us a very cool
checkout-and-forget deployment without any build-scripts, so I’d like to keep
this going on).

On servers we manage, this isn’t an issue, but some customers insist on
hosting PopScan within their DMZ and provide a pre-configured Linux machine
running OS versions that weren’t quite current a decade ago.

Have fun compiling node.js for these: There are so many dependencies to meet
(a recent python for example) to build it – if you even manage to get it to
compile on these ancient C compilers available for these ancient systems.

But I really wanted coffee.

So here you go: Here’s a statically linked (this required a bit of trickery)
binary of node.js v0.4.7 compiled for 32bit Linux. This runs even on an
ancient RedHat Enterprise 3 installation, so I’m quite confident that it runs
everywhere running at least Linux 2.2:

(SHA256: 142085682187a57f312d095499e7d8b2b7677815c783b3a6751a846f102ac7b9)

pilif@miscweb ~ % file node-x86-v0.4.7
node-x86: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), for GNU/Linux 2.2.5, statically linked, for GNU/Linux 2.2.5, not stripped

The binary can be placed wherever you want and executed from there – node
doesn’t require any external files (which is very cool).

I’ll update the file from time to time and provide an updated post. 0.4.7 is good enough to run coffee script though.